This boy has a new (‘nother) blog

Howdy.

To kick-off my journey back into academe as a student, I’ve created a new site. I’ll use it to document and share research and activities related to my Masters of Arts program. It’s partially a blog, partially a journal, partially whatever you want it to be.

kyle's masters

So far, so good. Have a visit, if you’re interested. Follow along, if you’d like.

kylemackiemasters.wordpress.com

This site will still continue to see some action.

Change is Good.

change

cc: flickr.com/photos/smemon

Great times of change here.

On the work front:

On the learning front:

  • back to school for all of us it seems, in some way, shape or form

On the blog front:

  • new theme…like it?

Stay tuned for a wild ride.

Try something new for 30 days & Keep your goals to yourself

Part of a series of weekly TED talks I’ve been watching and thinking about. Have a look, have a think, comment if you’d like. A couple quick videos today, one about trying new things and an interesting take on goals.

Matt Cutts: Try something new for 30 days

Derek Sivers: Keep your goals to yourself

At least you finished?

June is a hyper-busy time for us. End of school, ramping up for summer vacation, year end presentations, the list goes on. It tends to be a time when we showcase what we’ve learned over the past year to welcome feedback and praise. It’s and important part of what we do, the sharing and evaluation of our accomplishments.

Last night was my daughter’s year-end piano recital. She did an awesome job, despite losing her place in her solo piece. “At least you finished”, was my feeble attempt at consoling her. Reflecting on it now, however, I don’t know if it’s “just about finishing”. It’s about putting yourself in a position where you can finish, isn’t it? It’s about entering a space where you’re able and willing to showcase what you’ve been working on. It’s about being brave and confident enough to try and to be assessed, and to potentially fail. I think that’s a big part of what learning’s about. Learning is important. It *has* to be.

Reflecting on all this, and internalizing it, tonight marks my first attempt at a public 5k run. I’ll be running through the streets of my hometown of Grimsby:

peachbud 5k

Last time I was running through Grimsby…well, maybe that’s a story for another time. Despite a tender ankle and a muscle strain, I’m committed to doing it. I was thinking it was going to be about finishing, but I’m not convinced that that’s the case anymore. Wish me luck, y’all.

Beatjazz & Different Ways of Knowing

Part of a series of weekly TED talks I’ve been watching and thinking about. Have a look, have a think, comment if you’d like. Some interesting thoughts here with regards to accessibility.

Onyx Ashanti: This is beatjazz

Daniel Tammet: Different ways of knowing

Learning from each other, while we do our thang!

I’ve been watching the first season of Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids (thank you, Netflix). My kids love it. The show stands up pretty well. The theme song is damn catchy.



Did you know that William Henry “Bill” Cosby, Jr. earned a Doctor of Education degree from the University of Massachusetts? It’s a fact.

What can we learn from the gang’s stories?

  • Effective learning should be relevant and take into consideration the learners’ contexts. Learning is highly situational. The Gang learned on their terms, on their turf.
  • Media can be an effective tool for learning. The Brown Hornet cartoon-within-a-cartoon bumbling superhero episodes were short, brilliant, engaging learning-bytes and conversation starters.
  • Learning is social.
  • A song or 2 can always help. People learn in different ways, and let’s not forget what the arts can teach us.
  • The show is built around the power of experiential learning. Cosby guides the gang through Kolb’s model of concrete experience, reflection, abstract conceptualization and active experience.
  • Learning can be fun. “And if you’re not careful, you might learn something before you’re done.”

A Manifesto for Play & A Moral Operating System

Starting a series of TED talks I’ve been watching and thinking about. The plan is to post 2 or 3 videos at the beginning of the week. Have a look, have a think, comment if you’d like.

Steve Keil: A manifesto for play, for Bulgaria and beyond

Damon Horowitz calls for a “moral operating system”