Master of Karaoke?

Karaoke Star!

cc: flickr.com/photos/derekgavey

From the “Research Interests” section of my application package:

“My course work will focus on media, technology and literacy. The proposal for my research project is to focus on media-enhanced presentation styles that encourage improvisation and participation. Specifically, I will be examining PechaKucha, Ignite, PowerPoint Karaoke, and Battle Decks events. My final project will explore how these presentation styles can contribute to meaning-making and community building in an educational setting.

My research will focus on these presentation styles as a new type of literary form; a digital, participatory, fluid and multi-modal script. Through an examination of these presentation formats, I’ll discuss how the enforced structure of these styles affects the information presented, suggesting that the rules demand a creative and intentional approach to meaning-making. I will look at ways in which this enhanced script creates a new performative experience, establishing new relationships between the presenter, audience members and external online participants who are contributing to the discourse during the presentation. I will explore the interplay between the live events and the online commentary, examining how the boundaries blur between the "real" presentation and the "backchannel" conversation, and how this interplay can serve to enhance or distract from the intended meaning of the performance.

My research will draw from and advance the work done by Guelph’s Media Education Project and the international Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice research project. I will be working with educators to explore how these presentation styles can be incorporated into course delivery and student assessment.  Together with these educators, I will explore the new literacies necessary for students to be able to effectively participate in and learn from these new presentation styles.  Beyond the context of the University, I will build partnerships with the technology and arts community and community-based organizations, with the goal of creating a community engaged approach to this scholarship.”

@barrydahl put it well: “Cool – you’re going to get a degree in PechaKucha and Karaoke. I’m looking for a program in slot car racing and ping pong.”

I’ll show him!

D2L UNconference 2010. It’s happening.

D2L Unconference banner

The Desire2Learn UNconference aims to bring together D2L Users to exchange information, improve communications and build partnerships. Designed to immediately precede D2L’s FUSION 2010 Users Conference. July 11th, 2010. 6:30pm – 11:30pm. Chicago.

Visit the event’s website for more information and to get your ticket. This will be a great opportunity for D2L users to learn and share. There are limited tickets available for this event. You don’t want to miss out.

(the site is best viewed in Firefox, Safari or Chrome, if you’re using IE…switch!)

We’ve all got stories to tell

Documentary film focusing on the University of Guelph’s recent hosting of the Human Library Project. (I’m in there somewhere 😉 …)

Video produced by Alec Wilson.

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Lifeskill: Learn how to present

I’m starting to come down from a bit of a high after presenting at IgniteWaterloo 2.0.

Videos to be posted soon.

A quick shout out to the organizers and all those who presented. A mighty thanks to everyone who attended as well. Y’all should know that we’re starting to plan for IgniteGuelph, June 17th. Not much to look at on this page yet, but stay tuned.

I’ve been thinking a fair amount about how people learn to do effective presentations. I get the sense that most (myself included), learn by watching other presenters, doing a quick search, and then just doing. I’ve certainly found that the more I present, the more comfortable I am, and the better my presentations are.

I’d like to make the case that the ability to craft and deliver effective and engaging presentations should be recognized as a core competency and built into curriculum in secondary school and higher education. I think that presentation skills are as important as numeracy, literacy and writing skills. From what I’ve seen (and I hope I just haven’t found it yet), there are no training or guidelines made available to students. Unfortunately, the exposure students have to other approaches to presenting either comes from their peers (who tend to have similar skills, approach, & experience) or their teachers/instructors (who have a…range…;P).

Presenting is an art and it requires training and practice. People need to know learn how to develop good visuals, to deliver content in engaging ways, to present to different audiences using different media and with different styles, and (I think this is really key), to know how to adjust a presentation to a different style/media/timing on the fly.

I’m encouraging teachers/instructors out there to think about building alternative presentation styles into their course assignments. What about having students do ignite-style talks? If you teach, what about giving one yourself at the beginning of each week? each class? how about once?

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Community is the framework (and it has a fancy new logo)

DemoCampGuelph

DemoCampGuelph is for anyone in and around Guelph interested in software, the web and technology!

Startup junkies, wage slaves, consultants, students, indie professionals, engineers, designers, money and marketing guys.

If you want to see and talk about some interesting things, and get to know other people in the Guelph tech community, come on out! You don’t have to demo to attend.

Thanks to the sponsors (for the food), the presenters (for the demos) and the organizers (for letting me in).

Here’s the slidedeck from the opening talk from @missrogue: